NATIONAL TOOTH FAIRY DAY!!!!!!

ToothFairy

For hundreds of years, mystical legends, stories, and traditions have been shared about the loss of baby teeth. In some cultures, children’s teeth were buried in order to hide them from witches and evil spirits who would use the tooth’s powers for voodoo. The Vikings believed that children’s teeth had a magical power in them that would help them fight in battle. They would even pay their children for their lost baby teeth so that they could be used to string onto battle necklaces and other jewelry.

Over time, people began to share stories about a Tooth Mouse who would scamper around town and steal children’s teeth in the middle of the night. This story of the mouse soon transformed into the story of the Tooth Fairy, who would leave treasures under the children’s pillows in exchange for their lost teeth.

The traditions and legend of the Tooth Fairy are still practiced today all around the world. It is considered a useful practice by many parents because it gives their children something to look forward to when they lose their teeth. And so year after year, baby teeth are placed under children’s pillows at night in hopes of waking up to a wonderful surprise from none other than the Tooth Fairy.( http://www.toothfairy.org/2012/01/04/hello-world/)

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THUMB SUCKING

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Thumb Sucking

Sucking is a natural reflex and infants and young children may use thumbs, fingers, pacifiers and other objects on which to suck. It may make them feel secure and happy, or provide a sense of security at difficult periods. Since thumb sucking is relaxing, it may induce sleep.

Thumb sucking that persists beyond the eruption of the permanent teeth can cause problems with the proper growth of the mouth and tooth alignment. How intensely a child sucks on fingers or thumbs will determine whether or not dental problems may result. Children who rest their thumbs passively in their mouths are less likely to have difficulty than those who vigorously suck their thumbs.

Children should cease thumb sucking by the time their permanent front teeth are ready to erupt. Usually, children stop between the ages of two and four. Peer pressure causes many school-aged children to stop.

Pacifiers are no substitute for thumb sucking. They can affect the teeth essentially the same way as sucking fingers and thumbs. However, use of the pacifier can be controlled and modified more easily than the thumb or finger habit. If you have concerns about thumb sucking or use of a pacifier, consult your pediatric dentist.

A few suggestions to help your child get through thumb sucking:

Children often suck their thumbs when feeling insecure. Focus on correcting the cause of anxiety, instead of the thumb sucking.

Children who are sucking for comfort will feel less of a need when their parents provide comfort.

Reward children when they refrain from sucking during difficult periods, such as when being separated from their parents.

Your pediatric dentist can encourage children to stop sucking and explain what could happen if they continue. If these approaches don’t work, remind the children of their habit by bandaging the thumb or putting a sock on the hand at night. Your pediatric dentist may recommend the use of a mouth appliance.

http://www.childrensdentalhealth.net/pediatric-info.php#thumb_sucking

ORAL PIERCINGS

Oral Piercing

Be VERY VERY sure you want to go ahead and do this.

Not as safe as you think…..

Piercing, like tattooing, is just one of today’s popular forms of ―body art and self-expression. Piercing may seem daring, cool and totally safe because some celebrities use piercing to flaunt their particular style or attitude. But piercing the tongue, lips, cheeks or uvula (the tiny tissue that hangs at the back of the throat) is not as safe as some would have you believe. That’s because the mouth’s moist environment—home to huge amounts of breeding bacteria—is an ideal place for infection.

An oral piercing can interfere with speech, chewing or swallowing. That may seem like a mere inconvenience until you consider that it may also cause:

–  Excessive drooling (something you won’t see in hip fashion magazines!)
–  Infection, pain and swelling
–  Chipped or cracked teeth
–  Injuries to the gums
–  Damage to fillings
–  Increased saliva flow
–  Hypersensitivity to metals
–  Scar tissue
–  Nerve damage

These harmful effects can happen during the piercing, soon after, or even long after the procedure. 
An infection can quickly become life threatening if it’s not treated promptly. For example, oral piercing carries a potential risk of endocarditis, an inflammation of the heart valves or tissues. Bacteria can enter the bloodstream through the piercing site in the mouth and travel to the heart, where it can colonize on heart abnormalities. This is a risk for people with heart conditions and, in the worst of cases, results in death. 
After a piercing the tongue may swell. There have been reports of swelling serious enough to block the airway. And it’s very possible to puncture a nerve during a tongue piercing. If this happens, you may experience a ―numb tongue—nerve damage that is sometimes temporary, but can be permanent. The injured nerve may affect your sense of taste, or how you move your mouth. And damage to the tongue’s blood vessels can cause serious blood loss. 
In addition, piercing jewelry can sometimes cause allergic responses to the pierced site. The jewelry can even get in the way of dental care by blocking x-rays.

Don’t pierce on a whim. The piercing will be an added responsibility to your life, requiring constant attention and upkeep. Talk to your dentist for more information.

National Children’sDental Health Month

National Children’s Dental Health Month

Each February, the American Dental Association (ADA) sponsors National Children’s Dental Health Month to raise awareness about the importance of oral health.

Developing good habits at an early age and scheduling regular dental visits helps children get a good start on a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums.

Every hygienist will tell you to Floss, Floss, Floss!!! Why?!?!? Flossing is one way of caring for your teeth. It starts where brushing stops as it reaches the parts that your brush can’t. Over time, micro-organisms (bacteria, micro-parasties and viruses) can build up to form dental plaque. If left alone, it can cause inflammation and redness of the gums. This is the first step in gum disease, known as Gingivitis. So……that is one reason why you should floss daily. If you don’t take care of gingivitis, it may possibly develop into the more serious condition known as periodontitis.

So, be good to your teeth and floss….work for the Gold Medal Smile 🙂

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