When the economy’s down, keep your dental health up!

There’s no way to sugarcoat it: many households across America are suffering the effects of the current economic slowdown, and people are worried about their finances. When household budgets are tight, consumers start looking to cut down on what they consider to be unnecessary services, and in some cases that includes dental checkups. Before you cut us out of your schedule, please consider carefully the many repercussions of this decision, and how it could rebound to end up costing you more money in the long run.

It’s a proven fact that overall health is linked to oral health. In fact, the American Academy of Periodontology has evidence that infections in the mouth can lead to a host of other, seemingly unrelated, medical problems in some people. The rationale behind this is that periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection, and infections starting in the mouth could easily enter the blood stream and travel to major organs to begin new infections.

While more research continues to be conducted, findings to-date suggest a possible link between periodontal disease and a higher risk of heart disease, stroke, uncontrolled diabetes, preterm births and respiratory disease.

Even if your mouth and teeth feel fine to you, we, as dentists, cannot stress strongly enough the importance of regular dental checkups. Gum disease is something that is often hard to detect without a formal examination, which is why your dental visits should be a regular part of your health schedule.

We urge you to be diligent with your dental appointments especially if you already have heart or lung disease, diabetes or osteoporosis and low bone mass, if you are thinking of becoming pregnant, or if you have a family member with periodontal disease. Routine oral examinations can also uncover symptoms of oral cancer, eating disorders, substance abuse and HIV.

Thorough dental checkups, including X-rays when necessary, are an essential part of preventive health maintenance. Don’t wait until something hurts; if you haven’t already scheduled your next dental checkup, please call us today! 734.485.2200

Custom Sports Guards/ Mouth Guards

Mouth Guards and Sports Guards!

Dr David Schmidt recommends you use a mouthguard during any activity, sport, that could result in a blow to the face or mouth. A properly fitted mouthguard can help prevent broken teeth and injuries to the lips, tongue, face or jaw. It will stay in place while you are wearing it, making it easy for you to talk and breath.

Ask your dentist about having a custom mouthguard made specifically for you. This will fit well and offer the best protection for your smile.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need a mouth protector?

Anyone who participates in a sport that carries a significant risk of injury should wear a mouth protector. This includes a wide range of sports like football, hockey, basketball, baseball, gymnastics, and volleyball.

Mouth protectors, which typically cover the upper teeth, can cushion a blow to the face, minimizing the risk of broken teeth and injuries to the soft tissues of the mouth. If you wear braces or another fixed dental appliance on your lower jaw, your dentist may suggest a mouth protector for these teeth as well.

 

What are the advantages of using a mouth protector?

Accidents can happen during any physical activity. A mouth protector can help cushion a blow to the face that otherwise might result in an injury to the mouth. A misdirected elbow in a one-on-one basketball game or a spill off a bicycle can leave you with chipped or broken teeth, nerve damage to a tooth or even tooth loss. A mouth protector can limit the risk of such injuries as well as protect the soft tissues of your tongue, lips and cheek lining.

A properly fitted mouth protector will stay in place while you are wearing it, making it easy for you to talk and breathe.

 

Are there different types of mouth protectors?

There are three types of mouth protectors:

  1. Stock
    Stock mouth protectors are inexpensive and come pre-formed, ready to wear. Unfortunately, they often don’t fit very well. They can be bulky and can make breathing and talking difficult.
  2. Boil and bite
    Boil and bite mouth protectors also can be bought at many sporting goods stores and may offer a better fit than stock mouth protectors. They should be softened in water, then inserted and allowed to adapt to the shape of your mouth. If you don’t follow the directions carefully you can wind up with a poor-fitting mouth protector.
  3. Custom-fitted
    Custom-fitted mouth protectors are made by your dentist for you personally. They are more expensive than the other versions, but because they are customized they can offer a better fit than anything you can buy off the shelf.

 

I wear braces. Can I use a mouth protector?

A properly fitted mouth protector may be especially important for people who wear braces or have fixed bridge work. A blow to the face could damage the brackets or other fixed orthodontic appliances. A mouth protector also provides a barrier between the braces and your cheek or lips, limiting the risk of soft tissue injuries.

Talk to your dentist or orthodontist about selecting a mouth protector that will provide the best protection. Although mouth protectors typically only cover the upper teeth, your dentist or orthodontist may suggest that you use a mouth protector on the lower teeth if you have braces on these teeth too.

If you have a retainer or other removable appliance, do not wear it during any contact sports.

Dr Schmidt offers custom mouth guards with custom colors as well! Call us if you or your child is in need of a custom made mouth guard!  734-485-2200