Dr.Schmidt & Team’s Christmas Cookie Exchange Winner – Candy Cane Snowball

Here at the office we enjoyed a Christmas Cookie Exchange.  Talk about some delicious cookies. Yum!

Ypsilanti dentist Christmas Cookie Exchange -Candy Cane Snowballs

We decided to vote for the favorite cookie and the Office Christmas Cookie Contest WINNER was our hygienist Susan B. with the Candy Cane Snowballs.

We thought you all would like to have the winning cookie recipe.

Candy Cane Snowball Recipe

 You will need:

 2 cups of butter, softened      

1 cup confectioner’s sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

3 1/2 cups all purpose flour

1 cup chopped pecans

8oz white candy coating, coarsely chopped

1/3 to 1/2 cup crushed peppermint candy

 1. In a large bowl, cream butter and confectioner’s sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in vanilla. Gradually add flour and mix well. Stir in pecans. Refrigerate for 3-4 hours or until easy to handle.

 2. Roll into 1in balls. Place 2in apart on un-greased baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees for 18-20 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove cookies to wire rack and let them cool.

 3. In a microwave, melt candy coating at 70% power for 1 minute and stir. Microwave at additional 10 – 20 second intervals, stirring until smooth.

 4. Dip the top of each cookie into the candy coating; allow excess to drip off. Then dip into crushed peppermint candy. Place on waxed paper and let them set.

 

 Let us know what you think of this recipe.  

Don’t forget to Brush 😀

Congratulations to Susan!

Yours for better dental health,

Dr.Schmidt & Team


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The Basics of Bad Breath

Bad breath- the down low, the dirty and the details…

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On the DNL (Down Low)….

Have you noticed friends or co-workers stand further away than necessary to talk to you? Do you receive daily offers of gum and mints? Does your dog run away when you bend down and say hello? If the answer is yes to any of these questions … you probably have bad breath, also called halitosis.

How is it possible for you to have bad breath and not know it? Your body uses a process called acclimation to filter out its own scents so you can use your nose to detect outside smells. This means your nose is used to whatever odor is emitting from your mouth. Even if you cup your hand and breathe into it, you probably won’t detect foul aromas. So, how can you tell if you have halitosis?

The easiest test for determining if your breath is rank is to ask someone. Friends or family members will probably be more than happy to render an honest opinion. Another way to test for bad breath is to wipe your tongue with a cotton ball and give it a whiff. Or go to a mirror, stick out your tongue, and see if it looks whitish. Ew! That’s accumulated bacteria, which produces the sulfur compounds that create halitosis.

Why do I have bad breath? (The dirty!)

The most common reason people have bad breath is decaying food particles and bacterial growth in the mouth, especially on the tongue. If you have poor oral hygiene habits, the accumulation of food and bacteria will make your breath smell like you ate gym socks for lunch.

There are other reasons for bad breath. Gum disease and cavities can produce halitosis, and so can systemic illnesses such as diabetes, acid reflux (GERD), and sinus infections. In fact, if you have chronic bad breath that doesn’t respond to any of your freshening and cleansing attempts—you may have a larger health concern, and should make an appointment with your dentist.

How do I avoid bad breath? Details…!

Keeping a daily oral hygiene routine can go a long way to prevent halitosis. Brushing and rinsing in the mornings and evenings, and flossing at least once a day, can remove the food and bacteria that are the main causes for bad breath. And you can brush after meals, too, to ensure any strong-smelling foods you’ve eaten are eradicated from your teeth and gums. Other measures you can take to prevent halitosis are:

Drink plenty of water. Water loosens and rinses away food particles and also encourages saliva production.

Eat grains!  High Liquid diets, diets high in cheese, diets high in protein milk shakes- they all leave phlem on the back of your tongue- thus a great place for that nasty stinky bacteria to grow! Eat toast for breakfast, sandwiches for lunch or bread at dinner.  The very back of your tongue you can not get to with anything- but toast does a great job cleaning it off.

Chew gum that’s either sugar-free or sweetened with Xylitol.Chewing also encourages saliva production, and minty flavors help freshen breath.

Rinse with an antibacterial mouthwash. Your dentist may have suggestions for the best over-the-counter mouthwashes, and may also give you a prescription oral rinse. One of the VERY best mouthwashes for bad breath is Breath RX.  It has a special formula to target the VOC’s that cause that horrible stinky breath!  Rinse 2x/day and by all means- scrape your tongue- THEN rinse and gargle.

Use a tongue scraper. These devices are designed to remove the bacteria and food debris that cling to your tongue’s surface. They do exceptionally better than a toothbrush which pushes it around and leaves it on your tongue (blech!).

Invest in an electric toothbrush. Studies have shown that electric toothbrushes are better at removing plaque, and since most of them are designed to turn off after a specified time, people tend to brush for a longer period.

Go to your regular checkups. Attending your regular exams with both your dentist and your medical doctor ensures your health issues will be addressed at their earliest appearance.  There are medical issues that show themselves through bad breath- so after you do all that and you still have issues- don’t be shy! That’s what we’re here for! Let us help you feel great about yourself again!

When the economy’s down, keep your dental health up!

There’s no way to sugarcoat it: many households across America are suffering the effects of the current economic slowdown, and people are worried about their finances. When household budgets are tight, consumers start looking to cut down on what they consider to be unnecessary services, and in some cases that includes dental checkups. Before you cut us out of your schedule, please consider carefully the many repercussions of this decision, and how it could rebound to end up costing you more money in the long run.

It’s a proven fact that overall health is linked to oral health. In fact, the American Academy of Periodontology has evidence that infections in the mouth can lead to a host of other, seemingly unrelated, medical problems in some people. The rationale behind this is that periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection, and infections starting in the mouth could easily enter the blood stream and travel to major organs to begin new infections.

While more research continues to be conducted, findings to-date suggest a possible link between periodontal disease and a higher risk of heart disease, stroke, uncontrolled diabetes, preterm births and respiratory disease.

Even if your mouth and teeth feel fine to you, we, as dentists, cannot stress strongly enough the importance of regular dental checkups. Gum disease is something that is often hard to detect without a formal examination, which is why your dental visits should be a regular part of your health schedule.

We urge you to be diligent with your dental appointments especially if you already have heart or lung disease, diabetes or osteoporosis and low bone mass, if you are thinking of becoming pregnant, or if you have a family member with periodontal disease. Routine oral examinations can also uncover symptoms of oral cancer, eating disorders, substance abuse and HIV.

Thorough dental checkups, including X-rays when necessary, are an essential part of preventive health maintenance. Don’t wait until something hurts; if you haven’t already scheduled your next dental checkup, please call us today! 734.485.2200

Bad Breath = Bad News!

 

Embarrassing and unsociable, bad breath is a common condition that many people suffer from needlessly.

 

Bad breath, or halitosis as it’s professionally known, can be caused by a number of everyday causes.

 

What you eat – or don’t eat.
Once garlic, onions and certain spices are absorbed into your bloodstream, their odors are transferred to the lungs, where they are expelled through your breath. You can mask the odors by brushing, flossing and rinsing with mouthwash, but until the food has been eliminated from your body, you won’t fully get rid of the smell.

 

Bad breath can also be a nasty side effect of today’s popular low carbohydrate diets. The reason for this is that low-carb diets force the body to burn stored fat instead of carbohydrates for energy. As the excess fat gets burned away, the body releases ill-smelling chemicals called ketones through the breath and urine. In addition, the high-protein component of low-carb diets can also contribute to halitosis since many cases of bad breath result from the breakdown of food particles that produce sulfur compounds, and high-protein foods are known producers of these compounds.

 

Your brushing and flossing habits.
It’s essential that you brush and floss your teeth daily in order to get rid of the food that can collect between your teeth, on your tongue and around your gums. If food particles are not removed, they can rot, leaving an unpleasant odor in your mouth.

 

Gum disease.
Persistent bad breath can be a sign of gum disease. If you notice that you have red, swollen or tender gums that bleed when you brush your teeth, or gaps in-between your gums and your teeth, you may be experiencing the first signs of gum disease. Talk to us about steps you can take to halt or even reverse the indications of this preventable disease.

 

Dry mouth.
Dry mouth, or xerostomia, occurs when the flow of saliva decreases. Dieting, fasting and the use of diet pills and other medications can slow down the production of saliva, which is known as “nature’s mouthwash” due to its function in washing away bacteria and sulfur compounds in the mouth that cause halitosis. Dry mouth can also be caused by salivary gland problems or from continuously breathing through the mouth. In addition to bad breath, dry mouth can also put patients at risk for cavities and gum disease. When saliva is not present in the mouth to continuously flush foods away, food particles may adhere to teeth and begin the decay process.

 

Tobacco.
Tobacco use leads to bad breath, amongst other medical problems. Talk to your dentist and doctor about tips to help you cut down or eliminate your tobacco habit.

 

Medical disorders.
An infection in the respiratory tract, chronic sinusitis, postnasal drip, chronic bronchitis, diabetes, gastrointestinal disturbance, liver or kidney ailments are some possible medical sources of bad breath. If we determine that your mouth is healthy and that your oral hygiene is on track, we may suggest a visit to your family doctor to determine alternate causes of bad breath.

 

If you have any concerns at all about your breath, please ask us us to help diagnose the cause of your bad breath! We’d love to help you! 734.485.2200

 

Custom Sports Guards/ Mouth Guards

Mouth Guards and Sports Guards!

Dr David Schmidt recommends you use a mouthguard during any activity, sport, that could result in a blow to the face or mouth. A properly fitted mouthguard can help prevent broken teeth and injuries to the lips, tongue, face or jaw. It will stay in place while you are wearing it, making it easy for you to talk and breath.

Ask your dentist about having a custom mouthguard made specifically for you. This will fit well and offer the best protection for your smile.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need a mouth protector?

Anyone who participates in a sport that carries a significant risk of injury should wear a mouth protector. This includes a wide range of sports like football, hockey, basketball, baseball, gymnastics, and volleyball.

Mouth protectors, which typically cover the upper teeth, can cushion a blow to the face, minimizing the risk of broken teeth and injuries to the soft tissues of the mouth. If you wear braces or another fixed dental appliance on your lower jaw, your dentist may suggest a mouth protector for these teeth as well.

 

What are the advantages of using a mouth protector?

Accidents can happen during any physical activity. A mouth protector can help cushion a blow to the face that otherwise might result in an injury to the mouth. A misdirected elbow in a one-on-one basketball game or a spill off a bicycle can leave you with chipped or broken teeth, nerve damage to a tooth or even tooth loss. A mouth protector can limit the risk of such injuries as well as protect the soft tissues of your tongue, lips and cheek lining.

A properly fitted mouth protector will stay in place while you are wearing it, making it easy for you to talk and breathe.

 

Are there different types of mouth protectors?

There are three types of mouth protectors:

  1. Stock
    Stock mouth protectors are inexpensive and come pre-formed, ready to wear. Unfortunately, they often don’t fit very well. They can be bulky and can make breathing and talking difficult.
  2. Boil and bite
    Boil and bite mouth protectors also can be bought at many sporting goods stores and may offer a better fit than stock mouth protectors. They should be softened in water, then inserted and allowed to adapt to the shape of your mouth. If you don’t follow the directions carefully you can wind up with a poor-fitting mouth protector.
  3. Custom-fitted
    Custom-fitted mouth protectors are made by your dentist for you personally. They are more expensive than the other versions, but because they are customized they can offer a better fit than anything you can buy off the shelf.

 

I wear braces. Can I use a mouth protector?

A properly fitted mouth protector may be especially important for people who wear braces or have fixed bridge work. A blow to the face could damage the brackets or other fixed orthodontic appliances. A mouth protector also provides a barrier between the braces and your cheek or lips, limiting the risk of soft tissue injuries.

Talk to your dentist or orthodontist about selecting a mouth protector that will provide the best protection. Although mouth protectors typically only cover the upper teeth, your dentist or orthodontist may suggest that you use a mouth protector on the lower teeth if you have braces on these teeth too.

If you have a retainer or other removable appliance, do not wear it during any contact sports.

Dr Schmidt offers custom mouth guards with custom colors as well! Call us if you or your child is in need of a custom made mouth guard!  734-485-2200