Dental Injuries

19149361_10155221287756147_3351052593754793154_n.jpg

While most traumatic dental injuries occur in children and teenagers, people of all ages can be affected, however, frequently in children traumatic dental injuries often occur as a result of a sports accident,  If you’ve experienced a traumatic dental injury  (whether during sports or any other mishap) it is important to visit your dentist in order to determine any necessary treatment. Any dental injury, even if apparently mild, requires examination by a dentist immediately. Sometimes, neighboring teeth suffer an additional, unnoticed injury that will only be detected by a thorough dental exam. Please remember, not to panic, in most cases, tooth and mouth injuries are not life threatening. Rarely, a child may develop serious complications. Injuries to the teeth and mouth can also have long-lasting effects on the child’s appearance and self-confidence.

Just a few statistics for you:

  • Sporting activities cause the greatest percentage of dental traumatic injuries in teens. Pre-teens and teens have the highest number of sports related dental injuries, with the top 3 sports being; Basketball, Biking and Hockey.
  • 50% of all children and teens will suffer at least one traumatic injury to a tooth by the time they graduate high school.
  • About 80% of all dental injuries affect at least one of the front teeth. Damage to the tongue or cheek is common, too.
  • Young men suffer traumatic tooth injuries 2-3 times more often than young women.
  • About 80% of all dental injuries affect at least one of the front teeth. Damage to the tongue or cheek is common, too.

With good oral hygiene and routine dental checkups; a nutritious diet low in sugar we can usually take good care of our teeth. When children (and adults) take part in sports however, it is perhaps a good measure to wear appropriate protective gear such as a custom-made mouthguard and helmet when playing sports. If your child does complain of toothache or suffers a dental injury, make sure he or she sees your family dentist or pediatric dentist (a specialist in children’s teeth) as soon as possible. This is usually preferable to seeking care at an emergency room, as hospitals often do not have trained personnel or equipment to handle dental emergencies — unless there is a dentist or oral surgeon on call. Of course, there are times when you have no choice but to rush your child to the nearest ER.

Don’t forget your toothbrush!!!!!!

YAY!!! Vacation time!!!

YAY!!! Vacation time!!!

Whether you’re going for a camping in the wilds of beyond, city sightseeing, calm relaxing beach, family and kids Disney resort or visiting friends and relatives type of vacation you STILL need to look after your teeth and keep up with your dental hygiene regime while you’re away.

City Vacation

City Vacation

With the pressures of daily life that we all experience these days (and doesn’t it just always seem to be ever more pressure piling on??) your vacation is a time when you hope to relax, unwind and rejuvenate. There is never the thought, that you might have to spend time tracking down a dentist whilst on your travels. Finding a dentist on your home turf can be difficult enough, never mind when you are far away from home and, especially if you are out of the country.

Disney

Disney

While we are used to our dentists here in the US being trained over an 8 year period (after earning their undergraduate degree) and in some cases going on to do further training in one of 9 specialties, as well as having to pass national exams and meet individual State requirements before they get their license to practice. This is not necessarily the case in every other country, especially if you are going to be visiting or traveling in developing countries or remote areas where access to dental care is extremely rare if not impossible.

Camping Vacation

Camping Vacation

So!!! What do you do to minimize the possibility of needing a trip to a dentist while you’re on vacation?

Dental Exam

Dental Exam

First of all; make sure you keep up to date with your regular exams and cleanings. At least this way, you allow your dentist to keep on top of any minor issues that are just developing, such as checking to make sure you have no cavities needing fillings and that all fillings, crowns, dentures and retainers are fitting properly and not loose.  Remember, that if you are flying, air cabin pressure can accelerate pain in sensitive areas and may also cause discomfort after some medical and dental procedures. So, you will need to factor in recovery time and follow up appointments when you organize your vacation dates.

Secondly; make time for your dentist to take care of any issues he finds before you leave as any minor things could easily turn into pain or sores that could really spoil your vacation.

Thirdly; double check with your heath insurance to find out if there are any in-network providers where you are going. Also, find out their policies on emergency coverage, when you will be somewhere without coverage. Remember to take your insurance card with you, both medical AND dental. Think about having a separate credit card as a contingency to cover emergency costs and any co-pays.

Disposable Toothbrush

Disposable Toothbrush

Lastly; take a supply of disposable brushes (that you can use anywhere), toothpaste, mouthwash and floss with you. If you can find the pre-pasted disposable brushes that don’t need water all the better for ‘on the go’ brushing. Just remember, that if you are somewhere remote, or in a developing country you should use bottled water to rinse rather than use the local supply.

Relaxing break

Relaxing break

Hopefully, you will have no issues, dental, medical or otherwise and that your vacation will truly be what you hope for………just DON’T FORGET YOUR TOOTHBRUSH!!!!!